Paying Attention: Why You Want to Have a Filter

By: Daniel Hass, 2nd year PhD candidate in the Neuroscience Graduate Program At any given moment, we are constantly bombarded by signals from at least four of the five senses. The visual system is constantly processing our surroundings. The auditory system is stimulated by all of the many miniscule sounds that compose our environment. We’re taking in … Continue reading Paying Attention: Why You Want to Have a Filter

How Fancy Labels Fool Us: The Neuroscience Behind Bias

By: Caitlin Millett, 3rd year PhD candidate in the Neuroscience Graduate Program The holiday season is fast approaching, and that means it’s time for gift buying. With each passing season, finding the perfect gift for loved ones seems to become more and more difficult—a phenomenon not unrelated to the seemingly exponential growth in buying options each year. So … Continue reading How Fancy Labels Fool Us: The Neuroscience Behind Bias

Smells Ring Bells: How Smells Can Trigger Emotions and Memories

By: Amanda White, Research Technologist in the Department of Psychiatry Autumn has arrived, bringing with it some of my favorite scents:  bonfire smoke, pumpkin spice (DON’T JUDGE!), and, most of all, crisp autumn air. Stepping outside on an October morning and breathing instantly transports me back in time. I’m at Penn State. It’s a cool, … Continue reading Smells Ring Bells: How Smells Can Trigger Emotions and Memories

Why Graduate Students Should Meditate

By: Caitlin Millett, 3rd year PhD candidate in the Neuroscience Graduate Program “Educating the mind without educating the heart is no education at all.” ― Aristotle Meditation is an ancient practice dating back at least three millennia. It’s a fundamental component of many Eastern religious traditions and belief systems including Hinduism, Buddhism, and Daoism, to name just a … Continue reading Why Graduate Students Should Meditate

NFL Players Sue over Painkillers—Because They’re Addicted

By: Andrew Huhn, 4th year PhD candidate in the Neuroscience Graduate Program America loves football. Brutal, high-flying, smash-mouth football. The players seem like gladiators from another era. Chiseled out of stone, they feel no pain as they run, jump, and catch with a grace that appears super-human. The reality is, however, that they do feel pain—and often … Continue reading NFL Players Sue over Painkillers—Because They’re Addicted

A Prosthesis to Fix Broken Memories

By: Daniel Hass, 2nd year PhD candidate in the Neuroscience Graduate Program The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has been a major funding source for the development of unique and innovative technologies under its motto of “driving technological surprise.”  Some of DARPA’s current projects include designing bullets that can adjust their course in-flight, novel techniques to … Continue reading A Prosthesis to Fix Broken Memories

“Clarifying” Neural Circuitry: A New Technique to Image the Brain

By: Daniel Hass, 1st year PhD student in the Neuroscience Program The brain is complicated. There are hundreds of structures, layers, and cell types interacting with each other in complex ways in order for us to perform simple tasks, such as maintaining heart beat or moving a finger.  Much of this complexity comes from the … Continue reading “Clarifying” Neural Circuitry: A New Technique to Image the Brain

From Sacks to Suicidality: Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy and the NFL

By: Jordan Gaines Lewis, 3rd year PhD candidate in the Neuroscience Graduate Program Ah, football. The great American pastime. The fresh cut grass and crisply-painted yard lines. The sound of helmets clashing in an epic stack of large men vying for a single ball. Stands packed high with thousands upon thousands of crazed, prideful, body-painted … Continue reading From Sacks to Suicidality: Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy and the NFL