Short on Blood: How the COVID-19 Pandemic Led to a Blood Shortage

By Gaelyn Lyons Photo Credit: American Red Cross In the US, someone needs blood every two seconds (American Red Cross, n.d.-a). To put in perspective how much blood is needed, someone involved in a car accident may need up to 100 units of blood, which is about 100 pints. Importantly, blood isn’t only given to … Continue reading Short on Blood: How the COVID-19 Pandemic Led to a Blood Shortage

Food for Thought: How Diet Can Affect Your Brain

By Rebecca Fleeman We are consistently told that throughout our lives we should “eat right and exercise”. Ask anyone why diet and physical activity are important, and they will likely respond with answers on disease prevention and longevity. The general public is largely aware that a bad diet can lead to weight gain, and that … Continue reading Food for Thought: How Diet Can Affect Your Brain

Disparities in Genetic Testing Widens the Gap in Medical Treatment for Minorities

By Olivia Marx Did you know that there are more genetic differences between populations of Africa than there are between Africans and Eurasians?1 Despite the worldwide diversity of genetic sequences, most of the thousands of genomes that have been recorded have been from people of European background. Even with the decades of time and effort … Continue reading Disparities in Genetic Testing Widens the Gap in Medical Treatment for Minorities

How Brian May Genetically Recombined Rock Music with Astrophysics in 1975

By Julia Simpson Setting the scene for November 21st, 1975: The Vietnam War had ended in April1 and the success of the US-Soviet Apollo-Soyuz mission in July offered hope of geopolitical stability2. NASA’s Venera 9 mission departed Earth for Venus in June, and in October, it beamed back the first-ever images of another planet’s surface3. … Continue reading How Brian May Genetically Recombined Rock Music with Astrophysics in 1975

Benchwork Outside of Academia: A Career Interview with an Industry Scientist

By Stephanie Baringer Many trainees enter graduate school because they truly enjoy performing experiments. They live off the feeling of when an assay finally works after months of optimization. For some, the highs of success outweigh the lows of failed experiments. However, the thought of becoming a principal investigator (PI) and running your own lab, … Continue reading Benchwork Outside of Academia: A Career Interview with an Industry Scientist

Heart to Heart: How a Single Nucleotide Change Can Restructure the Heart

By Joseph Cirilo Have you ever experienced one of those days where you come home after a long day of work, sit down to relax to some Netflix or Hulu, and then whatever you decide to watch throws work right back into your face? Well, I recently had this experience while watching the TV show … Continue reading Heart to Heart: How a Single Nucleotide Change Can Restructure the Heart