Endometriosis: The Excruciating Invisible Disease

By Victoria Silvis May 8th-14th, 2022 is National Women’s Health Week, a time where women are reminded to put themselves first and ensure they are looking out for their own health and wellbeing. So, let’s shed light on an invisible, chronic, and debilitating disease that affects an estimated 2-10% of women across the nation (Figure … Continue reading Endometriosis: The Excruciating Invisible Disease

Epstein-Barr Virus and Multiple Sclerosis: How a Ubiquitous Pathogen Leads to Rare Disease

By Cole Burgess Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an auto-immune disease of the central nervous system (CNS) that involves auto-reactive lymphocytes (simplified to B cells). MS affects 400,000 people in the United States and nearly 2 million people worldwide, according to a study published in 20181. MS occurs more commonly in women than men at a … Continue reading Epstein-Barr Virus and Multiple Sclerosis: How a Ubiquitous Pathogen Leads to Rare Disease

COVID-19 Causes Lingering Brain Fog: How Can We Combat The Effects?

By Laura Budurlean Are you a victim of “brain fog”? You can blame the pandemic. Individuals previously infected with SARS-CoV-2, resulting in COVID-19, sometimes experience lingering brain fog, one of the symptoms of post-acute COVID-19 syndrome (PACS or “long-COVID”). Brain fog is characterized by a general confusion, an inability to focus, and decreased mental clarity … Continue reading COVID-19 Causes Lingering Brain Fog: How Can We Combat The Effects?

Treating obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD): Is surgery an option?

By Rachel Kallus, PsyD Over the last few years, organizing has evolved from your least favorite chore to a trendy topic on social media, Netflix reality shows, and loads of advertisements. Organizing icons and brands like Marie Kondo and The Container Store have become household names we refer to constantly. With people spending more time … Continue reading Treating obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD): Is surgery an option?

What’s Diss? Explaining my (diss)ertation titled “Investigating the Wnt/MYC axis in the pathogenesis of Crohn’s disease”

By Stephen Matthews, Ph.D. This article is based on the dissertation of Dr. Stephen Matthews who defended his thesis at PSCOM on June 2, 2021. TL;DR: Genetic variants can be linked to diseases through genome-wide association studies. While some variants are found in protein coding genes, many are found in non-coding regions of the genome, … Continue reading What’s Diss? Explaining my (diss)ertation titled “Investigating the Wnt/MYC axis in the pathogenesis of Crohn’s disease”

A Neuroscientific Perspective of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

By Nicole Lookfong The COVID-19 pandemic has created psychological consequences within the population, such as an increased risk for developing post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), by way of chronic stress, increased perception of threats, rising mortality rate, and limited resources1. Normally, the prevalence of PTSD in the United States is 7-8%, with individuals experiencing symptoms such … Continue reading A Neuroscientific Perspective of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

I Make the Good Guts Go Bad: An Introduction to Inflammatory Bowel Disease

By Stephen Matthews There’s a lot of misconception surrounding inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). I find most people have heard of it, but few people understand what it is or what patients with IBD deal with. As a researcher working on IBD, I thought I could take some time to explain some of the complications, treatments … Continue reading I Make the Good Guts Go Bad: An Introduction to Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Hear Ye, Hear Ye, How Do I Hear Thee?

By Joseph Cirilo From the alarm clock in the morning, conversations with co-workers, to the timer in lab informing you that your incubation is finished, sound dominates how we act each and every day. Unfortunately, there is a large population in the US that suffers from hearing loss. According to the National Institute of Deafness … Continue reading Hear Ye, Hear Ye, How Do I Hear Thee?

The First Use of CRISPR to Treat a Genetic Disease in a Live Patient

By Ryan Hylton Basic concept of the CRISPR-Cas9 system. Photo Credit: Vox/Javier Zarracina At least 6,000 human diseases are caused by heritable genetic mutations1. A long-time dream of physicians and patients alike has been to specifically treat these diseases by manipulating the genetic code in affected patients. This dream became one step closer to reality … Continue reading The First Use of CRISPR to Treat a Genetic Disease in a Live Patient