The Life of Aducanumab: A Potential Novel Alzheimer’s Disease Drug

On October 22nd, 2019, headlines read “Biogen plans regulatory filing for Aducanumab for Alzheimer’s disease based on new analysis of larger dataset from phase 3 studies”. Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disease characterized by cognitive dysfunction and memory loss. It is the 6th leading cause of adult deaths in the United States. Biogen … Continue reading The Life of Aducanumab: A Potential Novel Alzheimer’s Disease Drug

The Little Brain with Big Potential

Credit: Raman Oza from Pixabay Until recently, the cerebellum, often referred to as “the little brain,” was thought to regulate motor movements, balance, and coordination. However, according to an article published in 2009, the cerebellum has 70 billion neurons (compared to the 25 billion in the cerebral cortex) giving it 2.5 times more neurons than … Continue reading The Little Brain with Big Potential

Don’t forget about the stars in your brain!

Figure 1: Immunohistochemistry stain of astrocytes (Oksanen, 2017, Stem Cell Reports). In the late 19th century, Santiago Ramón y Cajal aided in the formation of the neuron doctrine, a theory which used evidence from neuronal staining techniques to confirm that neurons are each separate entities and not one continuous fusion of cells. These separations allow … Continue reading Don’t forget about the stars in your brain!

Teaching old neurons new tricks: the implications of regenerating brain cells in Alzheimer’s disease

Credit: Gerd Altmann from Pixabay Alzheimer’s disease is the 6th leading cause of death in the United States. Over 5 million Americans suffer from Alzheimer’s disease, and even more alarmingly, there are no medications to stop or slow the progression of the disease. Alzheimer’s is characterized by a loss of neurons resulting in symptoms of … Continue reading Teaching old neurons new tricks: the implications of regenerating brain cells in Alzheimer’s disease

Brainstorming a Way to Conquer Death

Credit: Skeeze from Pixabay Scientists’ jobs depend upon answering thought-provoking questions, but as a consequence of working in niche research areas, the answers they discover often lack lasting impact on the wider scientific community. However, once in a while, a study will exceed the standard and provoke profound and universal ethical questions. Vrselja et al.’s … Continue reading Brainstorming a Way to Conquer Death

Pregnancy Brain: A Neuroscientific Guide for the Expectant Mom (Part 2 of 2)

By: Jordan Gaines Lewis, 5th year student in the Neuroscience Graduate Program My forgetful friend – the subject of my original article – gave birth to a baby girl on Thanksgiving Day. She’s a beauty, and I know Mom agrees that the morning sickness, crazy sense of smell, and forgetfulness were worth it in the end. … Continue reading Pregnancy Brain: A Neuroscientific Guide for the Expectant Mom (Part 2 of 2)

Pregnancy Brain: A Neuroscientific Guide for the Expectant Mom (Part 1 of 2)

By: Jordan Gaines Lewis, 5th year student in the Neuroscience Graduate Program A few months ago, my friend asked me, “Why have I become so forgetful since I became pregnant?” I told her I didn’t know, but that I’d look into it and write an article for her. She then followed with, “I was going … Continue reading Pregnancy Brain: A Neuroscientific Guide for the Expectant Mom (Part 1 of 2)

The Immersive World of Virtual Reality: Why VR is the Ultimate Neuroscience Experiment

By: Lina Jamis, 2nd year student in the Anatomy Graduate Program The promise of virtual reality has always been an enticing one—slip on this headset and escape to a new place, without ever stepping foot outside of the room. It’s an experience so unusual, and yet so familiar, as it hijacks our own senses to provide the … Continue reading The Immersive World of Virtual Reality: Why VR is the Ultimate Neuroscience Experiment