Don’t forget about the stars in your brain!

Figure 1: Immunohistochemistry stain of astrocytes (Oksanen, 2017, Stem Cell Reports). In the late 19th century, Santiago Ramón y Cajal aided in the formation of the neuron doctrine, a theory which used evidence from neuronal staining techniques to confirm that neurons are each separate entities and not one continuous fusion of cells. These separations allow … Continue reading Don’t forget about the stars in your brain!

Teaching old neurons new tricks: the implications of regenerating brain cells in Alzheimer’s disease

Credit: Gerd Altmann from Pixabay Alzheimer’s disease is the 6th leading cause of death in the United States. Over 5 million Americans suffer from Alzheimer’s disease, and even more alarmingly, there are no medications to stop or slow the progression of the disease. Alzheimer’s is characterized by a loss of neurons resulting in symptoms of … Continue reading Teaching old neurons new tricks: the implications of regenerating brain cells in Alzheimer’s disease

Brainstorming a Way to Conquer Death

Credit: Skeeze from Pixabay Scientists’ jobs depend upon answering thought-provoking questions, but as a consequence of working in niche research areas, the answers they discover often lack lasting impact on the wider scientific community. However, once in a while, a study will exceed the standard and provoke profound and universal ethical questions. Vrselja et al.’s … Continue reading Brainstorming a Way to Conquer Death

Pregnancy Brain: A Neuroscientific Guide for the Expectant Mom (Part 2 of 2)

By: Jordan Gaines Lewis, 5th year student in the Neuroscience Graduate Program My forgetful friend – the subject of my original article – gave birth to a baby girl on Thanksgiving Day. She’s a beauty, and I know Mom agrees that the morning sickness, crazy sense of smell, and forgetfulness were worth it in the end. … Continue reading Pregnancy Brain: A Neuroscientific Guide for the Expectant Mom (Part 2 of 2)

Pregnancy Brain: A Neuroscientific Guide for the Expectant Mom (Part 1 of 2)

By: Jordan Gaines Lewis, 5th year student in the Neuroscience Graduate Program A few months ago, my friend asked me, “Why have I become so forgetful since I became pregnant?” I told her I didn’t know, but that I’d look into it and write an article for her. She then followed with, “I was going … Continue reading Pregnancy Brain: A Neuroscientific Guide for the Expectant Mom (Part 1 of 2)

The Immersive World of Virtual Reality: Why VR is the Ultimate Neuroscience Experiment

By: Lina Jamis, 2nd year student in the Anatomy Graduate Program The promise of virtual reality has always been an enticing one—slip on this headset and escape to a new place, without ever stepping foot outside of the room. It’s an experience so unusual, and yet so familiar, as it hijacks our own senses to provide the … Continue reading The Immersive World of Virtual Reality: Why VR is the Ultimate Neuroscience Experiment

Hooked on Pills? There’s a Pill for That…

By: Andrew Huhn, 4th year PhD candidate in the Neuroscience Graduate Program Americans are abusing prescription painkillers at an alarming rate. In 2012, 259 million prescriptions were written for opioid analgesics – that’s enough for every adult in the U.S. to have their own bottle of pills, according to the Centers for Disease Control. Opioid analgesics are a class … Continue reading Hooked on Pills? There’s a Pill for That…

When it Comes to Vision, Men and Women Really Aren’t Seeing Eye to Eye

By: Sadie Steffens, 4th year PhD candidate in the Biomedical Sciences Graduate Program The paint color in our master bathroom has been a source of debate since we bought our house. While I am certain that the color is firmly in the purple part of the spectrum, my husband insists that the paint is blue. Period. Visiting … Continue reading When it Comes to Vision, Men and Women Really Aren’t Seeing Eye to Eye