Brainstorming a Way to Conquer Death

Credit: Skeeze from Pixabay Scientists’ jobs depend upon answering thought-provoking questions, but as a consequence of working in niche research areas, the answers they discover often lack lasting impact on the wider scientific community. However, once in a while, a study will exceed the standard and provoke profound and universal ethical questions. Vrselja et al.’s … Continue reading Brainstorming a Way to Conquer Death

Pregnancy Brain: A Neuroscientific Guide for the Expectant Mom (Part 2 of 2)

By: Jordan Gaines Lewis, 5th year student in the Neuroscience Graduate Program My forgetful friend – the subject of my original article – gave birth to a baby girl on Thanksgiving Day. She’s a beauty, and I know Mom agrees that the morning sickness, crazy sense of smell, and forgetfulness were worth it in the end. … Continue reading Pregnancy Brain: A Neuroscientific Guide for the Expectant Mom (Part 2 of 2)

Pregnancy Brain: A Neuroscientific Guide for the Expectant Mom (Part 1 of 2)

By: Jordan Gaines Lewis, 5th year student in the Neuroscience Graduate Program A few months ago, my friend asked me, “Why have I become so forgetful since I became pregnant?” I told her I didn’t know, but that I’d look into it and write an article for her. She then followed with, “I was going … Continue reading Pregnancy Brain: A Neuroscientific Guide for the Expectant Mom (Part 1 of 2)

The Immersive World of Virtual Reality: Why VR is the Ultimate Neuroscience Experiment

By: Lina Jamis, 2nd year student in the Anatomy Graduate Program The promise of virtual reality has always been an enticing one—slip on this headset and escape to a new place, without ever stepping foot outside of the room. It’s an experience so unusual, and yet so familiar, as it hijacks our own senses to provide the … Continue reading The Immersive World of Virtual Reality: Why VR is the Ultimate Neuroscience Experiment

Hooked on Pills? There’s a Pill for That…

By: Andrew Huhn, 4th year PhD candidate in the Neuroscience Graduate Program Americans are abusing prescription painkillers at an alarming rate. In 2012, 259 million prescriptions were written for opioid analgesics – that’s enough for every adult in the U.S. to have their own bottle of pills, according to the Centers for Disease Control. Opioid analgesics are a class … Continue reading Hooked on Pills? There’s a Pill for That…

When it Comes to Vision, Men and Women Really Aren’t Seeing Eye to Eye

By: Sadie Steffens, 4th year PhD candidate in the Biomedical Sciences Graduate Program The paint color in our master bathroom has been a source of debate since we bought our house. While I am certain that the color is firmly in the purple part of the spectrum, my husband insists that the paint is blue. Period. Visiting … Continue reading When it Comes to Vision, Men and Women Really Aren’t Seeing Eye to Eye

Humans are Wired for Prejudice, but That Doesn’t Have to be the End of the Story

By: Caitlin Millett, 3rd year PhD candidate in the Neuroscience Graduate Program Humans are highly social creatures. Our brains have evolved to allow us to survive and thrive in complex social environments. Accordingly, the behaviors and emotions that help us navigate our social sphere are entrenched in networks of neurons within our brains. Social motivations, such as … Continue reading Humans are Wired for Prejudice, but That Doesn’t Have to be the End of the Story

Paying Attention: Why You Want to Have a Filter

By: Daniel Hass, 2nd year PhD candidate in the Neuroscience Graduate Program At any given moment, we are constantly bombarded by signals from at least four of the five senses. The visual system is constantly processing our surroundings. The auditory system is stimulated by all of the many miniscule sounds that compose our environment. We’re taking in … Continue reading Paying Attention: Why You Want to Have a Filter