Epstein-Barr Virus and Multiple Sclerosis: How a Ubiquitous Pathogen Leads to Rare Disease

By Cole Burgess Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an auto-immune disease of the central nervous system (CNS) that involves auto-reactive lymphocytes (simplified to B cells). MS affects 400,000 people in the United States and nearly 2 million people worldwide, according to a study published in 20181. MS occurs more commonly in women than men at a … Continue reading Epstein-Barr Virus and Multiple Sclerosis: How a Ubiquitous Pathogen Leads to Rare Disease

COVID-19 Causes Lingering Brain Fog: How Can We Combat The Effects?

By Laura Budurlean Are you a victim of “brain fog”? You can blame the pandemic. Individuals previously infected with SARS-CoV-2, resulting in COVID-19, sometimes experience lingering brain fog, one of the symptoms of post-acute COVID-19 syndrome (PACS or “long-COVID”). Brain fog is characterized by a general confusion, an inability to focus, and decreased mental clarity … Continue reading COVID-19 Causes Lingering Brain Fog: How Can We Combat The Effects?

Navigating Conversations with Vaccine-Hesitant Family and Friends

By Julia Simpson One year into the COVID-19 pandemic, members of my extended family began reaching out to me with questions about the Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines that the FDA had approved under Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) just a month prior1, 2. Anti-vaccine rhetoric rang through their social circles and media, and they hoped that, … Continue reading Navigating Conversations with Vaccine-Hesitant Family and Friends

Tackling HIV Prevention, One Shot At A Time

By Chris Kendra Fighting the spread of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) has become easier than ever with newly developed therapeutics. In addition to current once-daily pills, new tools in the fight against the HIV epidemic have come in the form of two types of long-lasting injectable HIV medications, one as a first line prophylactic and … Continue reading Tackling HIV Prevention, One Shot At A Time

What’s the buzz about Mosquirix?

By Victoria Silvis While the world has focused on rapidly developing a vaccine for SARS-CoV2, the WHO recently approved a vaccine that has been developed for malaria, a serious illness endemic to poorer tropic and subtropic regions globally. In 2020 alone, there were 229 million cases with an estimated half a million deaths.1 Malaria infections … Continue reading What’s the buzz about Mosquirix?

Controlling Outbreaks Before They Happen – Targeting Emerging Diseases at the Source

By Ian Hayman Bird Flu. Ebola. Hantavirus. Dengue. Zika. SARS-CoV2. Bubonic Plague. West Nile. Malaria. These pathogens are often cast as the central antagonist, the great evil in many books, movies, and in real life. Even hearing their names can produce a visceral response, a sense of dread in the back of the head about … Continue reading Controlling Outbreaks Before They Happen – Targeting Emerging Diseases at the Source

Recycling Pseudoscience for the Coronavirus Pandemic

By Carson Purnell Early in 2020, the tone around the Covid-19 pandemic quickly changed from a ‘bad flu’ to a worldwide catastrophe, to be compared to the 1918 flu pandemic’s 50-100 million deaths1. Nobody in the world had specific immunity to this pathogen, and it was clear the novel coronavirus was highly contagious and had … Continue reading Recycling Pseudoscience for the Coronavirus Pandemic

Lessons from Plagues Past

By Elizabeth Lesko There’s nothing quite like a global pandemic to pique the public’s interest in medical science. COVID-19 has been a prime example, with individuals around the globe demanding immediate answers to a complicated problem and wondering why scientists don’t seem to have this whole “communicable diseases” concept figured out. The modern media cycle … Continue reading Lessons from Plagues Past