From Bakery to Bench: How Scientists use Yeast for Biomedical Research

By Gaelyn Lyons Yeast has been an essential tool to our society since the beginning of time. Beer, bread, and wine all use yeast due to their ability to undergo fermentation.1 Not only does yeast contribute to creating yummy food, but it also plays an important role in biomedical research. Many scientists, including some at … Continue reading From Bakery to Bench: How Scientists use Yeast for Biomedical Research

What’s Diss? Explaining my (diss)ertation titled “Investigating the Wnt/MYC axis in the pathogenesis of Crohn’s disease”

By Stephen Matthews, Ph.D. TL;DR: Genetic variants can be linked to diseases through genome-wide association studies. While some variants are found in protein coding genes, many are found in non-coding regions of the genome, leaving their relevance to disease unclear. My work identified the role of a Crohn's disease-associated SNP in a non-coding region of … Continue reading What’s Diss? Explaining my (diss)ertation titled “Investigating the Wnt/MYC axis in the pathogenesis of Crohn’s disease”

Natural Athleticism: Slam Dunk or Foul?

By Rebecca Fleeman March Madness, the annual American college basketball tournament of the top 68 Division 1 teams, and arguably the best form of entertainment all year, came to a close on Monday. Full of single-elimination games that have fans jumping out of their seats, the seven-round tournament is laden with legendary athletes who will … Continue reading Natural Athleticism: Slam Dunk or Foul?

Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome: Generational Trauma

By Brianna Evans Dr. Joy DeGruy coined the theory Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome (PTSS) and defines it as, “a condition that exists when a population has experienced multigenerational trauma resulting from centuries of slavery and continues to experience oppression and institutionalized racism today.”1 Is it possible that trauma can be passed down generations? Many diseases … Continue reading Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome: Generational Trauma

How Neanderthals Impacted Our Health

By Kevin Fundora Reconstruction of a male and female Neanderthal.(ScienceSource, S. Entressangle & E. Daynes) Do you sunburn easily or suffer from allergies? Are you wondering why some people have severe symptoms from COVID-19 while others do just fine? The reason why may be from genes we inherited from another species of human, the Neanderthals. … Continue reading How Neanderthals Impacted Our Health

Food for Thought: How Diet Can Affect Your Brain

By Rebecca Fleeman We are consistently told that throughout our lives we should “eat right and exercise”. Ask anyone why diet and physical activity are important, and they will likely respond with answers on disease prevention and longevity. The general public is largely aware that a bad diet can lead to weight gain, and that … Continue reading Food for Thought: How Diet Can Affect Your Brain

Disparities in Genetic Testing Widens the Gap in Medical Treatment for Minorities

By Olivia Marx Did you know that there are more genetic differences between populations of Africa than there are between Africans and Eurasians?1 Despite the worldwide diversity of genetic sequences, most of the thousands of genomes that have been recorded have been from people of European background. Even with the decades of time and effort … Continue reading Disparities in Genetic Testing Widens the Gap in Medical Treatment for Minorities

Heart to Heart: How a Single Nucleotide Change Can Restructure the Heart

By Joseph Cirilo Have you ever experienced one of those days where you come home after a long day of work, sit down to relax to some Netflix or Hulu, and then whatever you decide to watch throws work right back into your face? Well, I recently had this experience while watching the TV show … Continue reading Heart to Heart: How a Single Nucleotide Change Can Restructure the Heart

A Tale of Two Studies: The effects of APOE at the blood brain barrier in Alzheimer’s disease

By Stephanie Baringer It is always exciting for scientists to see their research interests published in high impact journals, such as Nature, Cell, and Science. One can imagine my excitement when two articles that focused on the blood brain barrier (BBB) and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) were published in Nature within about a month of each … Continue reading A Tale of Two Studies: The effects of APOE at the blood brain barrier in Alzheimer’s disease