De-extinction: What are the odds you’ll be eaten by a dinosaur?

By Olivia Marx As a budding biologist, my non-scientist family and friends sometimes seek my expert opinion on matters of the life sciences. Do they ask me my professional opinion on today’s pressing issues, such as “should we get the COVID-19 vaccine?” or “when does a fertilized egg become a fetus?”. No, they have already … Continue reading De-extinction: What are the odds you’ll be eaten by a dinosaur?

Inconceivable! The Mechanisms Behind Birth Control and the Importance of Knowing What is Best for You

By Gaelyn Lyons Ever since the Supreme Court overturned Roe V. Wade in July2022, there have been concerns about the right to birth control for people who menstruate. Justice Clarence Thomas's comments about reconsidering previous Supreme Court decisions on birth control fueled many of these concerns.1 In response, the House of Representatives passed a bill … Continue reading Inconceivable! The Mechanisms Behind Birth Control and the Importance of Knowing What is Best for You

From Bakery to Bench: How Scientists use Yeast for Biomedical Research

By Gaelyn Lyons Yeast has been an essential tool to our society since the beginning of time. Beer, bread, and wine all use yeast due to their ability to undergo fermentation.1 Not only does yeast contribute to creating yummy food, but it also plays an important role in biomedical research. Many scientists, including some at … Continue reading From Bakery to Bench: How Scientists use Yeast for Biomedical Research

Eavesdropping on Sperm Whales: The Cetacean Translation Initiative

By Julia Simpson An international team of roboticists, cryptographers, and biologists, along with experts in machine learning, underwater acoustics, and linguistics, recently assembled to decode messages from the deep1. That may sound like the title-card montage for the next “team of international super spies” blockbuster, but no: this is the diverse, interdisciplinary expertise behind the … Continue reading Eavesdropping on Sperm Whales: The Cetacean Translation Initiative

What’s the buzz about Mosquirix?

By Victoria Silvis While the world has focused on rapidly developing a vaccine for SARS-CoV2, the WHO recently approved a vaccine that has been developed for malaria, a serious illness endemic to poorer tropic and subtropic regions globally. In 2020 alone, there were 229 million cases with an estimated half a million deaths.1 Malaria infections … Continue reading What’s the buzz about Mosquirix?