Predicting Alzheimer’s Disease: The Rise of Novel Biomarkers

By Rebecca Fleeman Why are some diseases easy to diagnose and others aren’t? For instance, we can get a COVID rapid test and have a result in hours, whereas a disease like Alzheimer’s requires numerous tests over several months to make a diagnosis. Simply put, COVID is an infectious disease, caused by one single known … Continue reading Predicting Alzheimer’s Disease: The Rise of Novel Biomarkers

Getting to the Heart of the Problem: The Penn State Heart Legacy

By Victoria Silvis Since the first successful kidney transplant in 1954, organ transplantation has become an increasingly common procedure with over 39,000 occurring in the United States in 2020.1,2 While the pancreas, heart, and liver were the next organs to be transplanted in the 1960’s, organ procurement was a challenge, as the United Network for … Continue reading Getting to the Heart of the Problem: The Penn State Heart Legacy

Sluggish Cognitive Tempo (SCT): An Explanation of the Syndrome and its Impact on Learning

By Rachel Kallus, Psy. D How often do you feel tired, spacy, confused, and in your own world as you get through the day? The answer is probably quite different if you are a college student, overnight shift worker, new (or not so new) parent, or a vacationer on the beach. Despite different answers, we … Continue reading Sluggish Cognitive Tempo (SCT): An Explanation of the Syndrome and its Impact on Learning

What’s Diss? Explaining my (diss)ertation titled “Investigating the Wnt/MYC axis in the pathogenesis of Crohn’s disease”

By Stephen Matthews, Ph.D. TL;DR: Genetic variants can be linked to diseases through genome-wide association studies. While some variants are found in protein coding genes, many are found in non-coding regions of the genome, leaving their relevance to disease unclear. My work identified the role of a Crohn's disease-associated SNP in a non-coding region of … Continue reading What’s Diss? Explaining my (diss)ertation titled “Investigating the Wnt/MYC axis in the pathogenesis of Crohn’s disease”

Chasing the Dream of the Dermal Regenerator

By Julia Simpson Adventures exploring the Final Frontier make for entertaining television – the enduring success of Star Trek since the original series’ airing (1966-1969)1 testifies to that – but for the characters navigating often tumultuous interspecies politics, adventure can be a dangerous business. Fortunately for those characters, by the time Star Trek: The Next … Continue reading Chasing the Dream of the Dermal Regenerator

Key to a Healthy Mind is a Glass of Wine

By Savanna Ledford Anti-inflammatory properties of wine may protect you from Alzheimer’s Disease. From Olivia Lerche, Daily Express The Power of Wine             Research has shown that wine, the drink of choice for some when unwinding from a mentally exhausting day, may have a larger role for our health. What would you think if I … Continue reading Key to a Healthy Mind is a Glass of Wine

Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome: Generational Trauma

By Brianna Evans Dr. Joy DeGruy coined the theory Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome (PTSS) and defines it as, “a condition that exists when a population has experienced multigenerational trauma resulting from centuries of slavery and continues to experience oppression and institutionalized racism today.”1 Is it possible that trauma can be passed down generations? Many diseases … Continue reading Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome: Generational Trauma

I Make the Good Guts Go Bad: An Introduction to Inflammatory Bowel Disease

By Stephen Matthews There’s a lot of misconception surrounding inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). I find most people have heard of it, but few people understand what it is or what patients with IBD deal with. As a researcher working on IBD, I thought I could take some time to explain some of the complications, treatments … Continue reading I Make the Good Guts Go Bad: An Introduction to Inflammatory Bowel Disease