Endometriosis: The Excruciating Invisible Disease

By Victoria Silvis May 8th-14th, 2022 is National Women’s Health Week, a time where women are reminded to put themselves first and ensure they are looking out for their own health and wellbeing. So, let’s shed light on an invisible, chronic, and debilitating disease that affects an estimated 2-10% of women across the nation (Figure … Continue reading Endometriosis: The Excruciating Invisible Disease

Epstein-Barr Virus and Multiple Sclerosis: How a Ubiquitous Pathogen Leads to Rare Disease

By Cole Burgess Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an auto-immune disease of the central nervous system (CNS) that involves auto-reactive lymphocytes (simplified to B cells). MS affects 400,000 people in the United States and nearly 2 million people worldwide, according to a study published in 20181. MS occurs more commonly in women than men at a … Continue reading Epstein-Barr Virus and Multiple Sclerosis: How a Ubiquitous Pathogen Leads to Rare Disease

Winner of Spring 2022 Best LTS Blog Post

Thank you to everyone who voted for Lions Talk Science’s Best Blog Post of Spring 2022! The results are all in, and your favorite LTS article was "Stuff to Tick You Off" written by Greg Kincheloe! For his winning article, Greg will receive a $25 gift card! Additionally, our randomly chosen voter to win a $10 gift card is Lindsey Jackson! Congrats to … Continue reading Winner of Spring 2022 Best LTS Blog Post

How Aggressive and Costly is End-of-Life Care for Cancer Patients with Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementias?

By Xingran Weng, DrPH Let’s think about a tough situation Imagine an older individual has been diagnosed with cancer and moderate to severe Alzheimer’s disease (AD) (roughly 20% older persons with cancer diagnosed with dementia).1,2 The cancer prognosis is not optimal. Also, this individual has not yet discussed any treatment plans/goals with family members while … Continue reading How Aggressive and Costly is End-of-Life Care for Cancer Patients with Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementias?

Predicting Alzheimer’s Disease: The Rise of Novel Biomarkers

By Rebecca Fleeman Why are some diseases easy to diagnose and others aren’t? For instance, we can get a COVID rapid test and have a result in hours, whereas a disease like Alzheimer’s requires numerous tests over several months to make a diagnosis. Simply put, COVID is an infectious disease, caused by one single known … Continue reading Predicting Alzheimer’s Disease: The Rise of Novel Biomarkers

Is Your Research Killing The Planet While Saving Human Lives?

By Savannah Marshall As researchers, we set out to improve human health. However, laboratory research in the US emits over 21 million metric tons of carbon dioxide every year.1,2 The relationship between carbon emissions and harm to humanity is difficult to quantify, however, researchers at Columbia University reported in Nature Communications that every million metric … Continue reading Is Your Research Killing The Planet While Saving Human Lives?

COVID-19 Causes Lingering Brain Fog: How Can We Combat The Effects?

By Laura Budurlean Are you a victim of “brain fog”? You can blame the pandemic. Individuals previously infected with SARS-CoV-2, resulting in COVID-19, sometimes experience lingering brain fog, one of the symptoms of post-acute COVID-19 syndrome (PACS or “long-COVID”). Brain fog is characterized by a general confusion, an inability to focus, and decreased mental clarity … Continue reading COVID-19 Causes Lingering Brain Fog: How Can We Combat The Effects?

Getting to the Heart of the Problem: The Penn State Heart Legacy

By Victoria Silvis Since the first successful kidney transplant in 1954, organ transplantation has become an increasingly common procedure with over 39,000 occurring in the United States in 2020.1,2 While the pancreas, heart, and liver were the next organs to be transplanted in the 1960’s, organ procurement was a challenge, as the United Network for … Continue reading Getting to the Heart of the Problem: The Penn State Heart Legacy